Search

Natasha Bernal

Journalist

Tag

novel

1000 before 30 #51: Fight Club – Chuck Palahniuk

Phwoar. When I picked this up I didn't expect a rush. [Slight spoiler alert] A man is holding a loaded gun, cocked and ready to blow inside his own mouth at the top of a high rise building block. How... Continue Reading →

Advertisements

1000 before 30 #49: The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro

A gentle, beautiful tale about the end of an era. It's hard to say why you should read 'The Remains of The Day', except that it's excellent. Nothing really happens, if you think about it. The butler of a grand... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #48: The Rotters’ Club – Jonathan Coe

The coming-of-age story of a group of Adrian Mole-esque Birmingham boys. It's a time of strife, it's a time of unions - it's the 1970s. The (T)rotters live in a bustling, industrial city, and their three children Ben, Paul and... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #47: Brighton Rock – Graham Greene

A chance encounter with a newspaper man on a sunny day turns into a mystery that leads Ida Arnold on the hunt for a Brighton gang. Pinkie managed to pull off the murder of the decade at just 17. As... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #46: Flowers for Algernon – Daniel Keyes

A study on how human experiments can both enlighten and devastate their subjects. What would you do if you knew you were going to lose your mind? This is one of the saddest yet most beautiful stories I have ever... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #45: The house of the spirits – Isabel Allende

A bizarre family history ties in with the tumultuous destiny of an entire country in this epic story by Isabel Allende It's true, I read this in Spanish. I have read some Allende before (see my 'Como Agua para Chocolate'... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #44: A Wild Swan and Other Tales – Michael Cunningham

Classic fairytales retold with a current (and often gruesome) twist.With little over 100 pages, Michael Cunningham's short story collection packs a punch. Reinventing fairy tales isn't anything new, which is why it's slightly hard to get into this book. For... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #43 The Enchanted – Rene Denfeld

A female investigator works to save a notorious killer who has decided he wants to die, while an unnamed prisoner on death row finds beauty in the heart of the jail's darkness and despair. First of all, this has to... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #42: Joyland – Stephen King

An enjoyable murder mystery involving a fairground (and a fair dash of fate), Joyland is a coming of age story with a supernatural twist. You wouldn't expect Stephen King to sit down and write a story about a 21-year old... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #41: A confederacy of dunces — John Kennedy Toole

I've got two words on why you should read this book: MY VALVE. Ignatious J. Reilly is one of the most complex, hilarious, bizarre and annoying characters in the world. And he's just one of the amazing moving parts that... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #40: The Day of the Triffids — by John Wyndham

The end of the world is here. Unfortunately for our intrepid protagonist Bill Masen, he seems to have missed it. A mysterious comet seems to have left everyone who watched it permanently blind. As chaos reigns and desperate people begin... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #37 Transition – Iain Banks

Iain Banks' whirlwind narrative transcends time and space as rogue agents trying to escape an all-powerful organisation jump through parallel universes to survive. It takes around four chapters to get into an average Banks book (whether science fiction or normal... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #32: Mother Night – Kurt Vonnegut

Vonnegut excells with an exciting and dark memoir from a double agent during World War II. Howard W. Campbell Jr is, well, a bit of a Nazi. As the party's chief propagandaist during the war, he criticised Jews and justified... Continue Reading →

1000 before 30 #19 The Book of Strange New Things – Michel Faber

In which Michel Faber single-handedly attempted to quash, nay¬†exterminate, my love of literature on aliens. My friend Teresa instigated my re-exploration of Faber's work following a disappointing attempt with 'The Crimson Petal and the White'. The Book of Strange New... Continue Reading →

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: