nokia-retroThe third of April marks a historical anniversary for one of the most important gadgets of the present and the future: 40 years ago today, a Motorola executive picked up a mobile phone and made the first cellular call.

Although Martin Cooper (the man who made history) might not have known it at the time, the heavy brick-like gadget was the first step in the future of connectivity and communication. Dialing up a rival at AT&T, he wanted to know whether ‘the call sounded OK at their end’.

Recent data from the United Nations’ World Water Day showed that around the world, people have more access to mobile phones than working toilets. There are 6 billion mobile phones, according to the International Telecommunication Union, while 1.2 billion of the planet’s 7 billion people lack clean drinking water and 2.4 billion aren’t connected to wastewater systems.

This doesn’t just show technological advances surpassing geographical boundaries, it’s also a discouraging reality that in areas of India, China or various countries in Africa, the dependence on technology is superior to modern commodities. It’s shocking to find out that the average human has 2.5 gadgets on them at all times (open your bag and take a look!): smartphones, laptops, tablets, e-readers and Mp3 players are weighing down the lives of the ultra-connected.

Although we might use our mobile phones for browsing the internet, answering emails, social media, messaging and SMS more than ever before, phone calls are still an important part of communication. To celebrate the life of the mobile phone call, here’s an infographic by Blog Tactic which analyses the evolution of communication throughout history. Happy birthday mobile phone!

a-modern-history-of-human-communication_50290c19170d7

Creative commons photo courtesy of acroamatic

Advertisements